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Coleps, final stages of binary fission

 
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Charles Krebs



Joined: 13 Jul 2004
Posts: 1200
Location: Issaquah, WA USA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2005 11:38 pm    Post subject: Coleps, final stages of binary fission Reply with quote



I've watched this interesting process several times now, and wondered why the two individuals seemed to stay "nose-to-nose" for quite a long time after it appeared the fission process was completed. Today I saw why... it's obvious in the lower picture.

The top photo was taken about 12 minutes after I first noticed the fission occuring. The lower photo was taken 11 minutes after the top photo. After I took the lower picture, they remained connected in a mini tug-of-war for another 11 minutes before they became completely separated.

63X objective, 2.5X photoeyepiece. Canon 10D. Brightfield with electronic flash.
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discomorphella



Joined: 06 Jan 2005
Posts: 63
Location: NW United States

PostPosted: Thu Apr 07, 2005 11:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Charlie--

That's just a spectacular shot. I wonder what that final connecting strand would show under phase.

David
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lacerta



Joined: 12 Feb 2005
Posts: 139
Location: Georgia, USA

PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2005 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fascinating ! But what is that connecting strand?? Following cytokinesis there should be two identical and separate individual cells. Does this indicate an incomplete stage of separation, or is there some sort of cytoplasmic transfer going on between the two individuals?
George
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Charles Krebs



Joined: 13 Jul 2004
Posts: 1200
Location: Issaquah, WA USA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2005 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

George... I"m not sure. I've seen something very similar in P. bursaria and was able to get a few pictures. Posted one a while back:
http://www.photomacrography1.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=857
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Garry DeLong



Joined: 04 Apr 2005
Posts: 38
Location: Portland, Oregon USA

PostPosted: Tue Apr 12, 2005 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've noticed such tardy seperation several times myself. Even though the daughter cells appear clearly seperated, continued movement of the two cells together for a few seconds seems to indicate a tiny connection that still briefly exists.
Garry DeLong
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