Aeolosomas, A Moment of Passion

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Ken Ramos
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Aeolosomas, A Moment of Passion

Post by Ken Ramos »

Not to many find aquatic worms to be much of an interest. I am one of those also. However I could not help but to observe what was happening here, while scanning a wet mount prepared from a sample taken many moons ago. :D

Image

Sony DSC-P200
Zeiss Vario Tessar lens
1/80 sec. @ F/2.8 ISO 100 EV +0.3
Zeiss Axiostar
10X/0.25 Zeiss A-Plan objective
Halogen illumination w/blue diffuser

As you can see the larger Aeolosomas has attached its posterior to just behind the head of the smaller female (top).

Image

Sony DSC-P200
Zeiss Vario Tessar lens
1/20 sec. @ F/2.8 ISO 100 EV +0.3
Zeiss Axiostar
40X/0.65 A-Plan objective
Halogen illumination w/blue diffuser

In this image you can get a closer look of the action. It would be nice to have this in a digital vidio so you could see the exchange of "genetic" material going on here. But as you can see there is evidence of a flow of material between the two. :D
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Walter Dioni
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Aeolosoma

Post by Walter Dioni »

Ken:

What you photographed so beautifully and clearly is the end of the “paratomy” in an Aeolosoma individual. What you think is genetic material interchange is only the intestine, continuous through which still is a double individual. In minutes the second will separate from the first. This and his descendant will begin to grow each one by their rear end, will form a new head for the second individual and will finish like in your photos. In hours you will have 4 individuals. This reproduction is asexual. Sometimes there are several individuals in different stages of development belonging to only one chain.

Your photos of these worms are not only interesting. They are valuable. Of the 14 images of the network that I know (including 2 of my own) no one shows with detail the phenomenon of paratomy. Thanks for this contribution to the iconography of the Aphanoneura. I hope that you become fond of them and contribute other stages of the process and of the interesting anatomy of these primitive worms.

Best regards from Walter

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Post by gslaten »

Hi Ken and Walter,

Boy, I learn something from this forum everyday. Thanks to you Ken for the beautiful photos....great detail. Thanks to you Walter for the detailed explanation of what is happening here. I would not have had the foggiest idea.

Thanks,

Gary

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Post by Ken Ramos »

Thank You Gary and Walter for your comments. :D

Walter: I never realized that these worms were so important. I was under the assumption that this was just a causual event that goes on without much interest. However your explaination has now aroused my curiosity as to what I have observed and photographed here. You mentioned that they were valuable images. To whom and in what way? As research material for those studying the worm or others like it in its Family?

Paratomy is a new word in my vocabulary, Walter. I will have to look into it and see what this is all about. I am always interested in learning something new dealing with biological science. Especially if it is something that I can interact with and observe personally.

The reason I ask so many questions is that I am now concerened with the importance of these worms and what I have now photographed. Thank You Walter for your comments and for the information you have provided. You have changed my thoughts on these relatively small life forms. :D
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Post by Ken Ramos »

I have just finished reading an article on "Paratomic Fission." I found this to be quite interesting and if it were not for Walters information being given in response to my post of Aeolosomas, I would have never given such a thing a second thought. Thanks again Walter for your response and information concerning this marvelous form of reproduction among such now interesting creatures. :D

For anyone interested in Paratomical Fission and what it is about, the link at the bottom is as good a place to start as any. Although this does not refer specifically to Aeolosomas, it does address the reproductive methods of the annalids and other aquatic life forms that reproduce in similar ways. I did not know that there was such an interests in this particular form of reproduction by fission. :D

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/ ... i_92284519
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Wim van Egmond
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Post by Wim van Egmond »

Very interesting and a realy good shot of this organism. These oligochaete worms move quite fast and because it is long it is not easy to get the whole organism in on image! Excellent work!

Wim

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Post by Ken Ramos »

Thanks Wim :D I have never given much consideration to these worms in the past, until Walter posted his comments on them. I am always runnng across them in my collections. Maybe I will get some different ones other than the Aeolosomas in the future. Thanks again for the commet Wim :D
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Kenneth Ramos
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Walter Dioni
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Aeolosoma

Post by Walter Dioni »

Depending on your location in the planet :P have you good morning or good afternoon Ken and Wim:

It is a magnificent article the one that you found Ken. Extremely useful as a review that provokes thoughts and work.

In your collections, in addition to Aeolosoma, surely you will find Naidids, like the Pristina that the article names, but surely Catenulida as well. These are turbellaria that also form chains of individuals in fission.

All these worms need to be photographed faithfully, like Wim, Charles, and you do among others contributors of images. The available thing to the scientists generally are only drawings of black lines in publications of scientific magazines.

All color image with the detail that you can provide are really valuable. I think as an example in the outstanding pictures of Chilodonella fission, contributed recently by Wim

Wim: the Aeolosoma are no longer "oligocheta" (as we can continue to call them in colloquial language) scientifically they are classified now as Aphanoneura.

Regards from Walter

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Post by Ken Ramos »

Thank You for your reply Walter. :D You would think that with all the resources that professionals have at their disposal, there would be much more detailed images of these worms for them to work with, other than drawings. :shock: I have read in the past that a drawing is actually much better than a photograph because one, as an observer, picks up on the smaller details better than if they just photograph it. That is, I am assuming, for the person or scientist that is deeply involved in the study of such subjects. However there are those of us who are not very talented when it comes to pencile and paper and so rely on photographs to capture that which we observe.

As for myself, I am not much of a photographer. My main interests lie with in the study and research of such small creatures as may be found using the microscope. It is an enjoyment to photograph such creatures for display however, here in these forums, and there are some very talented microphotographers present here, who do much more excellent work than I. :D

Thank you once more for your comments and for your time Walter, to explain and to inform us on the particulars of the subject that I have presented here. :D
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Wim van Egmond
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Post by Wim van Egmond »

Interesting to hear that it is no longer called an Oligochaete. Thank you, Walter!

In the past I liked to make drawings myself but it is very time consuming and I don't have enough time for it now. Perhaps in the future. :D The nice things about drawings is that you can direct you attention to tghe most interesting aspects of an organism. I also try to do that with photographs but with drawings you can leave out all the uninteresting bits.

Wim

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Post by Ken Ramos »

Actually I love art work and used to do a lot of sketching, oil painting, and just plain old doodling but my skills have long since faded since I gave it up many years ago. I have heard than once you aquire a skill you usually retain most of it but not so with art I think. As they also say "practice makes perfect." :D
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