For Walter Dioni....

Post your images made through a compound microscope or made with a stereo/dissecting microscope in this gallery. Images may be of any subject natural or unnatural, living or non-living.

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Ken Ramos
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For Walter Dioni....

Post by Ken Ramos »

and anyone else who may be interested in these worms. Really I dislike putting circles and arrows in photographs but sometimes they are necessary. The arrow here points to what I believe is the brain of the Aeolosomas and a network of nerves, I can only assume, can be seen extending from the gray mass. I post this for not only interested parties but to get your input on this Walter as to what I am referring to as the "brain." :D You are right Walter there is little research material to be found for these organisms. Especially photographs. :(
Image

Sony DSC-P200
1/40 sec. @ F/2.8 ISO 100 EV +0.3
Zeiss Vario Tessar lens
Zeiss Axiostar
Zeiss 40X/0.65 A-Plan objective
Halogen illumination w/blue diffuser

Image

Specs. same as above

In this image I have photographed what seems to be the gapeing maw or mouth of the Aeolosomas. There is also what appears to be a ridge of teeth or a peristomal (is that a word, peristomal?) ridge surrounding the mouth. The blurred area or what may appear to be "noise," are actually the cilia with which the worm uses to draw in bacteria and detritus for consumption, much like protozoa in a sense. The blurred filament passing, unfortunately, in front of the mouth is one of those vauge cynobacteria I am assuming. Those that gather enmass and just slither around. :shock:

Along with Aeolosomas, there is another species of worm in this culture, that I have yet to identify but it too displays the process of paratomy or paratomical fission. :D
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Wim van Egmond
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Post by Wim van Egmond »

Although the images are dedicated to Walter I also realy enjoy them! :D

Wim

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Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

Thanks Wim :D I placed Walter in the header because he seemed so interested in them. At one time I never gave these creatures a second thought and looked at them as a bother in my cultures and my wet mounts when trying to observe protozoa. Then Walter brought it to my attention that their form of reproduction, paratomy, is quite rare. I have another associate that seems to be interested in them also but only slightly, because of paratomy. :D

The more I study these creatures, the more I am becoming involved or interested in their morphology. Sometimes they are a bit hard to photograph or observe without a thickening agent of some kind to slow them down some but there are times when they do become a bit more cooperative. Thanks again for your comment Wim and your interest! :D
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Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

Hey Ken... we've got them here in the Pacific NW too!

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Post by Ken Ramos »

Hey great Charlie, you even managed to capture the cilia around the body too! Walter said there were not many photos of this worm, well it looks like all that is changing huh? Great photograph Charlie. Thanks! =D>
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Walter Dioni
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Aeolosoma

Post by Walter Dioni »

Hello, in order:
Ken, Wim and Charlie:

Thank you very much for developing an interest in the iconography of the Aphanoneura. I could had added an image with the drawings that I made long time ago of 3 species of the Rio de la Plata, or even images of great specialists on this group, for you to became aware of the big difference that micro-photography do, as you practice it.

Ken, the pavement of cells is the ventral, ciliated and sensitive epidermis of the “prostomium” (The most anterior part) of the worm, in dorsal view. The thing indicated by the arrow is really the brain in which you can distinguish clearly a big anterior lobe and the two smallest posterior ones. The form and location are typical of Aeolosoma.

If you pay attention you can see that where the almost circular prostomium joints the cylindrical portion (which is called the peristomium) that has the mouth, there are seen two sensitive "ciliated pits”. They are dermal depressions with many cilia, more long that those that cover the ventral part of the prostomium.

And... since you are working on it, why not to do it systematically? :lol: For example it is necessary to count the number of segments of each worm. It is easy because each segment has four bundles of setae (1 to 6 in number), two dorsal and two ventral. It is important to photograph in detail the composition of the bundles. The relation of lengths (there could be long and short setae), the number of setae, etc.

See that (an important difference with oligochaeta and polychaeta) there is not a wall or “dissepiment” dividing the segments. Only the setae tell you how many segments there are.

You can also photograph the excretory systems (Called nephridia. They are like long twisted tubes that begin by a ciliated funnel and open to the exterior through the dermal wall). They are behind the setae bundles. The esophagus, the ciliated intestine and the rectum also offer good possibilities and sometimes the intestine can have gregarines (parasites protozoa) that are seen by transparency. And, finally, the true color of the dermal oil globules is very important, aid to differentiate the species. According to the species they can be red, crimson, orange, yellow, even green or bluish-green. :shock:

And, although it is very probable that you know this well, you can cultivate them easily and in enormous quantities with the lettuce culture medium described by Lybbie H. Hymann. Start your own collection of cultures of different species of Aeolosoma!!

Only the green lamina of the lettuce leaves are boiled, and kept in the refrigerator. Very small pieces are added to the culture (we do not want to rot the water) and the addition is repeated whenever the bacteria, protozoa, rotifers and worms that are developed disintegrate the previous piece. The technique is adaptable and applicable in small and in big scale and to all type of aquatic invertebrates (Cladóceres, Copepods, micro-Oligocheta, micro-Turbellaria, Hydra, Mollusks, etc.) which can be grow up in uni-specific, limited multi-specific culture, or in free combination of species.

Good hunting and have entertainment with Aeolosoma....and with the versatile culture medium of Hymann :D :D


Walter

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Post by Ken Ramos »

Thank you Walter for verifying and explaining the images presented. I was pretty sure that in the first image, I had photographed the brain but was unsure. You are right about there not being much in the way of photographs on these worms and I find detailed drawings to be fairly scarce also, in publication.

I have copied the information that you have stated here and will retain it in my files. I will be culturing Aphanoneura as per your instructions Walter and making observations as you suggested. Thanks so much again for your time Walter in explaining these creatures and the giving of your knowledge of them. :D
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Kenneth Ramos
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Kens Microscopy
Reposts of my images within the galleries are welcome, as are constructive critical critiques.

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