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Two Different Spiders

 
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gunn



Joined: 04 Jan 2005
Posts: 393
Location: Adelaide/KL

PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 4:08 am    Post subject: Two Different Spiders Reply with quote

Both taken around the same time. 20D/100f2.8/50f1.8. 1/250, f.11 to f.16, iso100, 380ex, reflectors & diffusers.





I think they are from different species; both are minute, less than 5mm. The first one is a very good jumper! The second has a very large end-section, a fat arse so to speak.
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gunn



Joined: 04 Jan 2005
Posts: 393
Location: Adelaide/KL

PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 4:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And since I'm allowed to post a third image, might as well make full use of it!



regards
gunn
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Ken Ramos
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Joined: 04 May 2004
Posts: 4809
Location: Western North Carolina

PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 4:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gunn said:
Quote:
And since I'm allowed to post a third image, might as well make full use of it!


Get all you can, while you can Gunn. Very Happy Great images here of Mr. Personality. Yep, they do have differences, markings, eyes, color, etc. I don't see to many around here. Maybe it is due to the fact that I may not be looking for them in particular. This is one spider that I am "kind of" (with apprehension) warming up to. Laughing
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rjlittlefield



Joined: 06 May 2005
Posts: 727
Location: Richland, WA, USA

PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 7:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Superb pictures, Gunn! So superb, in fact, that I was motivated to go looking for information... (Dear Google, find me what you can about "jumping spiders" eyes anatomy.)

I learned that the eyes of a jumping spider are dramatically different from the eyes of other small arthropods. Here are a few references that I found particularly enlightening (pun intended Wink ).

http://www.tolweb.org/accessory/Jumping_Spider_Vision?acc_id=1946. "<diagram> Note that the AME's [Anterior Median Eyes] are long and tubular, which helps their resolution (longer focal length, more magnification) but which means they have a narrow field of view. Since the AME's have a narrow field of view, the spider needs to point them in different directions to see different things. To some extent this is done by moving the carapace, but the eyes can move as well. This is not done by moving the whole 'eyeball', since the lenses of the eyes are actually built into the carapace. Instead the retina moves around, while the lens stays fixed. This retinal movement is accomplished by some small muscles: <diagram>"

http://www.boston.com/globe/search/stories/health/how_and_why/062998.htm "They have excellent resolution and can judge distance by comparing the difference in the image produced by each eye."

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Jumping_spider "Jumping spiders have very good vision centered in their anterior median eyes (AME). These eyes are able to create a focused image on the retina, which has four layers of receptor cells in it. Physiological experiments have shown that they may have up to four different kinds of receptor cell, with different absorption spectra, giving them the possibility of up to tetrachromatic color vision, with sensitivity extending into the ultra-violet range. Color discrimination has been demonstrated in behavioral experiments."

Pretty cool, eh? An image-forming lens in front of a multicellular retina, with muscular steering and stereo vision. Now that's an eye!

--Rik

Edit: to repair broken link


Last edited by rjlittlefield on Wed Nov 24, 2010 10:54 pm; edited 1 time in total
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gunn



Joined: 04 Jan 2005
Posts: 393
Location: Adelaide/KL

PostPosted: Wed Oct 05, 2005 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

woaw rik

the information you've provided is simply astonishing. and to think such an advanced eye-mechanism is housed within something of a fraction of a milimeter ! phew, we have come a long way !

thanks rik.

regards
ben gunn
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twebster
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Joined: 19 Apr 2004
Posts: 1518
Location: Phoenix "Valley of the Sun", Arizona, USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 06, 2005 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi ya' Ben Very Happy

I just love jumping spiders. In fact, I don't really think of them as spiders. They look like miniature Scottish terriers, to me. Very Happy

The second spider image is very neat, too. I can't make an ID of it (I ain't a spider expert) but, with those forward facing eyes, you can tell it is some sort of hunting spider. Love those eyes Exclamation Very Happy

Best regards as always, Very Happy
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MikeBinOKlahoma



Joined: 20 Nov 2004
Posts: 1491
Location: Umm....Could it be Oklahoma?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2005 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rik, thanks for posting that additional info. The bit about their middle eyes moving the retina is very cool!

Gunn, these are nice shots. I'd NEVER photographed one of these until recently, when I got two in one day (and yet another a couple of days after!).
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Hank



Joined: 07 Oct 2005
Posts: 2
Location: upstate NY

PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2005 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jumping spiders have indeed an amazing vision setup and are very alert, especially when eating something. Thank you rjlittlefield for posting the detailed anatomical info, I would have missed the very tiny eyes on the side of their heads.

I have recently videotaped a jumping spider (#1 in gunn's post) catching and eating another spider that looks like #2 spider.

http://tinyurl.com/bbqs2
or
http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id=2120441144&code=18628619&mode=invite&DCMP=isc-email-AlbumInvite

I guess, in the insect world, it doesn't pay to have a "fat arse".

Hank

The still pictures are captured from the video and reduced in size. I used the SONY TRV900 with a 35 mm reversed lens "a la Plonsky", handheld, natural light.
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